Angepinnt Doctor Who in den Nachrichten und Zeitungen

    Diese Seite verwendet Cookies. Durch die Nutzung unserer Seite erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden, dass wir Cookies setzen. Weitere Informationen

    • Doctor Who in den Nachrichten und Zeitungen

      Mal einen allgemeinen Thread zu interessanten Artikeln oder Berichten in TV oder sonstigen Medien. Ich hoffe so etwas gibt es noch nicht. Betrifft vor allem Artikel für die es sich nicht lohnt einen eigenen Thread zu eröffnen oder die nicht in den Spoilerthread passen. Wie dieser hier:

      guardian.co.uk/tv-and-radio/tv…doctor-who-female-writers

      Why Doctor Who needs more female writers
      The new season of Doctor Who, starting Saturday, doesn't use a single female writer. The count is similarly poor for other British science-fiction and fantasy shows – so what's the problem?

      On Saturday, Doctor Who returns, kicking off the second part of the seventh series with a James-Bond inspired episode that sees the Doctor and Clara whizzing round London on a motorbike. Which is exciting if you like interesting drama with witty banter and thoughtful concepts. But less exciting if you like interesting dramas that include women on their writing teams.

      Because season seven of Doctor Who will feature no female scribes at all. Not in the bombastic dinosaurs and cowboys episodes that aired last year, and not in any of the new episodes we're about to receive. In fact, Doctor Who hasn't aired an episode written by a woman since 2008, 60 episodes ago. There hasn't been a single female-penned episode in the Moffat era, and in all the time since the show was rebooted in 2005 only one, Helen Raynor, has ever written for the show.

      Isn't that is a pretty terrible record for a flagship TV programme? It even prompted website Cultbox to put together a list of women they would like to see writing the show, any of whom would be great.

      When questioned on the subject last year, Caroline Skinner, the show's recently departed executive producer, said that it was her intention to see more women writing for Doctor Who. But none has emerged. So I asked producer Marcus Wilson about his plans to improve the balance of male and female writers on the show. "Due to schedules and other projects, both male and female writers whom we have wanted to join the team simply haven't been able to," he said. "For us it's about who can write good Doctor Who stories, regardless of gender."

      There must surely be women capable of writing a good Doctor Who episode. But this problem of male-dominated script credits isn't just the good Doctor's. The writers' rooms of fantasy and science-fiction shows in the UK seem to be notable for their domination by men. Of 65 episodes of the recently axed Merlin, for example, only four were written by a woman. And the show bowed out with a series in which no women writers credited at all.

      Other shows can't even reach the giddy heights of one woman writer on the team. And in cases when a show comes from one just one writer, it tends to be a man who is behind the script, from The Fades to Outcasts to Misfits, which began with Howard Overman at the helm and then brought on board other male writers. (Overman will also write new BBC1 show Atlantis.) On CBBC, The Sarah Jane Adventures, a show rightly lauded for it's sixtysomething female lead, employed no female writers whatsoever. And the new Wizards vs Aliens? None there either.

      It's woeful. Author Jenny Colgan who, as JT Colgan, wrote a Doctor Who tie-in novel, says there are plenty of women writing fantasy and science fiction. "There should probably be more women in the room," she says. "I think producers and commissioners should sometimes be a bit bolder about trusting girls with their toys. I mean, come on: Margaret Atwood, Ursula le Guin, Madeleine L'Engel, Audrey Niffenegger, JK Rowling, Suzanne Collins, Stephanie Meyer ... it's hardly as if women don't have a proven track record."

      Given this raft of talent in literature, why aren't women writing in these genres for television? "A lot of it is down to mere tradition," says Paul Cornell, who has written for Doctor Who and Primeval. "TV writing itself, and then geekdom, have both, historically, been seen as male pursuits. But in both cases, that stereotype is over. OK, it persists as a joke about geekdom, but the reality of it is vanishing."

      Things are getting better, he suggests, with a growing number of female TV executives. "I think those executives are genuinely searching for new female talent, [so] perhaps we're just living during a couple of decades of that talent slowly arriving," he says.

      The situation is perhaps more promising in the US: while fantasy epic Game of Thrones, which also returns over the Easter weekend, is hardly bursting with female writers, it does have Vanessa Taylor on the team. Female writers have been working on shows such as True Blood and Once Upon a Time.

      "The good news [in the US] is, there have been a number of great women writers coming into genre television in the past decade, and this has coincided with a noticeable improvement in not just the female characters but the writing in general," says Charlie Jane Anders, co-editor of SF blog io9. "But there's still plenty of room for improvement – especially in the UK, where genre television seems to be entirely the work of a small group of male writers."

      Dramatist and author Stella Duffy – who has noted the absence of women writers, and indeed directors, from Doctor Who on her blog – thinks that there needs to be a conscious effort to recruit writers from outside the usual small pool of male writers. "Try harder. Stop assuming that men can do the job well enough. If women are saying they feel left out (and they do), if women are saying they feel marginalised (and they do), if women are saying they do not see their voices on screen ... Listen to them and do something about it," Duffy says.

      "We can knock and knock, but if they won't let us in, we'll never get to see how big the Tardis really might be inside. Right now, the Tardis only holds men, so maybe it's not that big, after all."
    • Dann zeige man uns erst einmal gute Doctor-Who-Drehbuchautorinnen! Leider habe ich nur diese Raynor noch im Kopf, und die fand ich furchtbar. Überhaupt mal was von guten Science-Fiction oder Sci-Fi Autorinnen gehört? Mir fällt da auf anhieb KEINE ein. Wie denn auch, wenn sich unter den Konsumenten fast nie Frauen befanden?
    • Ich hab' schon gute SF-Romane von Ursula K. LeGuin (Planet der Habenichtse z.B.) gelesen. Die waren allerdings auch nicht sehr SciFiig, aber das muss DW auch nicht unbedingt jede Folge sein. Enlightenment z.B. (recht gute Folge, nicht sehr SciFiig, von einer Frau)

      Edit: Trotzdem ist der Artikel totaler Käse.
      THEY SAY CHANGE IS GOD

      P.S.: Sollten Sie Dr. Allen sehen, erschießen Sie ihn und lösen
      Sie den Körper in Säure auf. Verbrennen Sie ihn auf keinen Fall.
    • diese Raynor
      Vorsicht: Raynor könnte zur Verwirrung führen. Helen ("Die! Die!" bzw. "Verpiss dich" laut whocast) Raynor hat die Dalek-Devolution und den Sontaran-Smog (der meine Schwester vermutlich für immer davon abgebracht hat Doctor Who eine zweite Chance zu geben) verbrochen. Jacqueline Raynor hat ein paar durchschnittlich bis gute Geschichten für Big Finish und die BBC-Books geschrieben.
      Doctor Who doesn't just travel in time, he travels in genre
      -Toby Hadoke, Timelash 2017

      Seil ist Geil
      -Cutec, Timelash 2017
    • witchking schrieb:

      Überhaupt mal was von guten Science-Fiction oder Sci-Fi Autorinnen gehört? Mir fällt da auf anhieb KEINE ein.


      Ursula Le Guin (Preisträgerin des Nebula und Hugo Awards) wird ja oben im Text erwähnt. Sie schrieb u.a. "Winterplanet/Die linke Hand der Dunkelheit" und "Planet der Habenichste". Was aber bei der Aufzählung J.K. Rowling und S. Meyes zu suchen haben, kann ich nicht nachvollziehen. Sollte hier nicht die guten Schriftstellerinnen genannt werden?
      1. 4thdoc 2. 3rddoc 3. 12thdoc 4. 2nddoc 5. 1stdoc 6. 11thdoc 7. 6thdoc 8. 9thdoc 9. 8thdoc 10. 7thdoc 11. 5thdoc 12. 10thdoc ... Doctröse!
    • J.K. Rowling ist nicht so schlecht wie ihr Ruf, aber auch nicht herausragend. Was diese S. Meyer da sucht ist aber wirklich eine gute Frage, die Frau kann genauso gut schreiben wie Helen Raynor und die gehört eher auf eine Liste von verdammt schlechten SciFi und Fantasy Autorinnen.
      4thdoc 11thdoc 1stdoc 2nddoc 8thdoc 9thdoc 6thdoc 12thdoc 7thdoc 3rddoc 5thdoc Wardoc 10thdoc
    • Rowling ist an sich eine gute Schreiberin, allerdings nicht das Wunderkind, als das die Potter-Fans sie feiern. Ansonsten...Karen Traviss hat relativ gute "Star Wars"-Romane geschrieben und es gibt einige gute Comic-Autorinnen.

      EDIT: Und da da nichts von aktuellen Schreiberinnen steht: Mary Shelley
      Doctor Who doesn't just travel in time, he travels in genre
      -Toby Hadoke, Timelash 2017

      Seil ist Geil
      -Cutec, Timelash 2017
    • Cutec schrieb:

      EDIT: Und da da nichts von aktuellen Schreiberinnen steht: Mary Shelley


      Ja, sie gehört auch noch dazu. In der Doku-Reihe "Propheten der SF" wird sie als Erfinderin der Science-Fiction benannt. Lustigerweise wird sie unter Gothic Horror zugeordnet, was auch nicht falsch wäre. Nur dumm, dass sie nichts mehr schreiben wird.
      1. 4thdoc 2. 3rddoc 3. 12thdoc 4. 2nddoc 5. 1stdoc 6. 11thdoc 7. 6thdoc 8. 9thdoc 9. 8thdoc 10. 7thdoc 11. 5thdoc 12. 10thdoc ... Doctröse!
    • Sag das nicht. Mit Hilfe von Schwarzer Magie werden sie alle wiederauferstehen...Da fällt mir ein, wenn Douglas Adams das Jubiläumsspecial schreiben soll machen wir uns besser auf den Weg. Und zeigt ihm nicht die Anhalter-Fortsetzung von Eoin Colfer. Der will doch sofort zurück unter die Erde.:D
      Doctor Who doesn't just travel in time, he travels in genre
      -Toby Hadoke, Timelash 2017

      Seil ist Geil
      -Cutec, Timelash 2017
    • Ich habs komplett gelesen. Der Anfang hat mir gar nicht gefallen. Aber nachdem die Vogonen von Thor aufgehalten werden und Random sich auf der neuen, von Zaphod bezahlten Erde niederlässt geht es stark bergab. Das Ende für Arthur war allerdings nicht ganz so unpassend. Er findet sich in seinem Paradies vom Anfang des Buches wieder und will sich gerade entspannen als ihm von einem Vogel erklärt wird, seine Hütte habe gegen die Bauvorschriften verstoßen und sei deswegen von den Vogonen desintigriert worden. Das war nicht ganz so grauenvoll. Mehr mittelmäßig unoptimal.
      Doctor Who doesn't just travel in time, he travels in genre
      -Toby Hadoke, Timelash 2017

      Seil ist Geil
      -Cutec, Timelash 2017
    • Die Sun berichtet mal wieder inkompetent wie immer vom Untergang von Doctor Who!

      thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/show…viewing-figures-down.html

      DOCTOR Who has shed a million viewers in a week — with last Saturday’s show branded the WORST EVER by disappointed fans. The latest episode, the second in the new BBC series, was watched by 5.7 million people, compared with the 6.7 million who tuned in at Easter. The drop is significant for the second instalment starring the Time Lord’s new companion Clara Oswald — played by actress Jenna-Louise Coleman, 26. She replaced Karen Gillan and Beeb chiefs hoped she would help lift ratings.

      Saturday’s episode, The Rings Of Akhaten, was the first written by respected scriptwriter Neil Cross — creator of the awardwinning Luther series.
      But despite his pedigree, angry fans took to social networks to complain the show had lost its way.
      Helen Paling tweeted: “Just caught up with Doctor Who. Wish I hadn’t. Boring rubbish.” Anna Hough wrote: “Genuinely the worst episode I have ever seen.”
      Tony Leech said: “The most forced, cringeworthy faux sentimentality since the Van Gogh episode. Terrible.”
      However many fans said they enjoyed the new direction for Matt Smith’s Doctor — and some noted that many watch later on iPlayer.
      A BBC spokeswoman said: “This episode convincingly won its slot. The series is in fine form and Jenna-Louise is a big hit with viewers.”
    • Zur Meldung ans sich:
      Tony Leech said: “The most forced, cringeworthy faux sentimentality since the Van Gogh episode. Terrible.”
      Zu diesem Satz:
      Doctor Who doesn't just travel in time, he travels in genre
      -Toby Hadoke, Timelash 2017

      Seil ist Geil
      -Cutec, Timelash 2017
    • Waris Hussein und Peter Purves finden New Who zu sexy: tv.uk.msn.com/news/doctor-who-too-sexy-director-1


      Jenna-Louise Coleman's character has a 'romantic relationship' with Matt Smith's version of the Doctor
      The man in charge of the first series of Doctor Who has criticised the recent reincarnation of the long-running science-fiction show, saying it has become too sexy.

      Waris Hussein directed the first episodes of the show, which starred William Hartnell as the Time Lord, in 1963.

      Appearing with cast members including Peter Purves and Carole Ann Ford on Radio 4's The Reunion, he said there had been a "sea change" in the show and highlighted Jenna-Louise Coleman's character's romantic relationship with Matt Smith's version of the Doctor.

      He said: "There is an element now, and I know we're living in a different era, of sexuality that has crept in.

      "The intriguing thing about the original person was that you never quite knew about him and there was a mystery and an unavailability about him. Now we've just had a recent rebirth and another girl has joined us, a companion, she actually snogged him."

      He said the Doctor should be "unavailable" like the character of Sherlock Holmes, saying: "Why bring in this element when in fact you needn't have it there?"

      Purves, who became a Blue Peter presenter after a stint as the Doctor's companion Steven Taylor, said he agreed "totally" with Hussein and said storylines had become too complicated.

      He said: "The original series was so simple. They were very straightforward, nice linear stories that one could follow."

      The show's 50th anniversary is due to be celebrated with a special 3D episode which will see Smith joined by former stars including Billie Piper and David Tennant, who played the 10th Doctor from 2005 to 2010.

      Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy actor John Hurt will co-star in the one-off show.
    • Die Meldung hatte ich auch schon gelesen und finde, daß sie Recht haben.
      Außerdem müßten die Beiden doch vielen hier aus dem Herzen gesprochen haben, die sich gegen die "Vermenschlichung" und die ständigen Flirtereien aussprechen.

      Mir geht River Song ja sowieso auf die Nerven und ich finde auch die Hochzeit mit dem Doctor sehr unpassend, nicht nur die Anhimmelei von Martha und Konsorten.
      Bei Rose konnte ich es noch nachvollziehen, weil er kurz zuvor seine Rasse verloren hat und jemanden brauchte, aber alles danach war irgendwie unpassend.
    • Was das Geknutsche mit den Companions angeht, geb ich den beiden völlig Recht. Das geht mir sowas von gegen den Strich, weils irgendwie allem widerstrebt was der Doctor für mich ist! Bei dieser ganzen Romantikschiene krümme ich mich regelrecht vor Widerwillen. Mit River hingegen habe ich inzwischen meinen Frieden gemacht - die beiden gehen als 'Paar' für mich in Ordnung, allerdings möchte ich auch wirklich niemals on screen sehen müssen wie sie sich küssen oder ähnliches. Die kleinen Szenen, wo der Doctor sich noch mal durch die Haare fährt und prüft ob sein Atem gut riecht, bevor er sie trifft finde ich sympathisch. ^^

      A World of Time and Space inside a funny Blue Box...




    • He said: "There is an element now, and I know we're living in a different era, of sexuality that has crept in.



      "The intriguing thing about the original person was that you never quite
      knew about him and there was a mystery and an unavailability about him.
      Now we've just had a recent rebirth and another girl has joined us, a
      companion, she actually snogged him."



      He said the Doctor should be "unavailable" like the character of
      Sherlock Holmes, saying: "Why bring in this element when in fact you
      needn't have it there?
      Ich finde es okay, wenn der Doctor sich verliebt/sich jemand in den Doctor verliebt. Allerdings möchte ich das dann nicht bei jedem Companion und wenn, dann entweder nicht so plakativ, wie manchmal in der neuen Serie, oder aber, im zweiten Fall, vom Doctor unerwidert. Allerdings frage ich mich woher es kommt, dass diese Vorwürfe von ihnen erst jetzt laut werden. Haben die seit 2005 die Serie zum ersten Mal kürzlich gesehen, oder hat man sie vorher einfach nicht gefragt?
      Hussein and said storylines had become too complicated.



      He said: "The original series was so simple. They were very straightforward, nice linear stories that one could follow."
      Ihre Meinung zu Storyarcs kann ich nachvollziehen, auch wenn ich sie nicht teile. Wegen mir kann es gerne komplex bleiben, darf aber auch meinetwegen wieder etwas simpler werden. Solange man nicht auf das Simplizitätsniveau einer Staffel 4 absinkt (der Storyarc: "Wal Rosedo wo bist du?" "Unser Planet is weg" und "Donna du hast da was"). Schön finde ich, dass hier nur gesagt wird "es ist mir zu komplex" und nicht, wie man es häufig in Foren liest "Ey so ein wirrer Dreck. Wurde ja gar nichts erklärt. Und wer war jetzt das Mädchen im Raumanzug? Die hat man vergessen.".
      The show's 50th anniversary is due to be celebrated with a special 3D
      episode which will see Smith joined by former stars including Billie
      Piper and David Tennant
      , who played the 10th Doctor from 2005 to 2010.
      Ich weiß manche Leute werden mich dafür hassen, dass ich es hier noch mal erwähne, aber jedes Mal wenn ich diesen Satz (oder Variationen davon) lese möchte ich weinen.
      Doctor Who doesn't just travel in time, he travels in genre
      -Toby Hadoke, Timelash 2017

      Seil ist Geil
      -Cutec, Timelash 2017